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20130121
20130129
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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
donors as well. former presidents jimmy carter, bill clinton, neither of the bushes coming. george h.w. bush still recovering from illness. you can see them setting up. putting name tags on the chairs. so everyone knows where to sit and laying out the official inauguration ceremony program. a lovely, lovely piece of paper right here. we got one ourselves. lays out the ceremonies that will be happening today in about six hours from now. zoraida. >> all right. thank you very much, john. president obama better get all of his partying done tonight. his second term is in full effect already and that means the potential for great achievements, but if history is any indicator, the second term is where things can get messy. it's not like he wasn't warned. >> i'm more than familiar with the literature about presidential overreach in second terms. >> president barack obama's victory dance is about to become a dance against destiny. >> if we look back, some really great examples of really big things being done in second terms. but recent history, there is the potential for real disaster. >> i did
happens. clean it up. it's family show. george w. bush never mentioned terrorism. that was the topic that dominated his term. i re-eisenhower's second inaugur inaugural. the most important thing was to send troops into little rock. i think most of these presidents have no idea what they're about to encounter. >> outside events end up shaping the legacy and how they respond. the president's maximum political power and validation is right now in this moment and in the next year. the question is does he strike while the iron is hot an does he take to the tendency which will be to appeal to the democratic pass and try to ram something through or do something against his nature and try to reach out against republicans and work with marco rubio on immigration. >> the interesting thing about political capital is mandates that what you create as the president. you can create more and grow more if you do well and if the economy comes back. there's a wild card here and it's iran. nobody needs to forget that iran will be major issue president obama will have have to wrestle with. >> i want to t
, jimmy carter, no bushes, however. george h.w. bush recuperating from illness and george w. bush had to send his regrets. look at the blue carpet. yesterday they had vacuums in here cleaning up and the glass you can see right there, just minutes, wiping it clean to make everything look absolutely perfect for the ceremonies again. the president will take the oath for the second time in two days at 11:30 this morning. soledad. >> john berman, thank you. let's get to john king. hey, john. >> soledad, hello to you. i don't think it's so chilly. i'm with you on the weather front. a beautiful spring day in washington. let's get to the team joining us on beach day in washington. we have the former obama deputy press secretary, margaret hoover, and brian liza for "the new yorker" and ron brownstein from "the national journal." we're going to head straight up to john borrasso, a conservative, and let's start with this morning. a new beginning for the president. is this a new beginning for the republican party. your leader, famously, infamous, started the first obama term saying the number one
in the senate, paul ripe in the house, and maybe we can have like george w. bush, a republin vision that had legal status and maybe even citizenship for those in this country illegally, ballpark number about 10 million. would a tea party member like you support that? in the past, you've called that amnesty. >> that would be real hard for me, and i defined amnesty, and not many have because they want the broader definition when it's convenient. to grant amnesty is to pardon immigration law breakers and reward them with the objective of their crime. if that's what this bill does, it would fit the definition of amnesty. >> could your speaker survive if he allowed that bill to come to the floor of the house of representatives? >> i think we'd want to look at the language on that. john boehner's tone and his body language and everything i heard him say at the retreat in williamsburg, he and our leadership team was all about how we pull our conference together and work together. i don't think you'll see another bill come to the floor that's got that large a number of democrat votes we've seen in t
ladies? >> i think it's very similar what presidents recently have experienced. george w. bush came hoping to change the environment. bill clinton came thinking he could change it. the last person who began to sense there were greater possibilities was reagan, that was almost a different political age. it was harder to govern then. >> you also think about, had the clintons and how bill clinton -- he seemed to revel in politics, the reaching out to people. in the article, i found it fascinating that the obamas haven't had bill and hillary clinton over for dinner. i -- i mean, she's -- all the things that bill clinton did during the campaign, all the work that hillary clinton's done, they've never had a dinner at the white house with them? >> i think this is something outsiders find difficult and surprising. the obamas can be vivacious, charming they have great public personalities. what people in washington see -- but i think people all over the country don't necessarily see it, there's an intro version there, a self-protectedness. the obamas said both when the president became famou
for george w. bush and critter for us. right now, 40% of active duty are women. this could be hundreds of thousand of jobs suddenly would be open to women. am i right in saying this is hublgly significant? >> it's absolutely enormous. the one thing i would say though, the it's not that we don't have women in combat positions. we have women who are ineligible under the former policy, but there really isn't any front line in today's wars. fighting heroically in combat, women who have died in combat. this change just recognizes what's already a reality, frankly. >> david, please be blunt. i know what you have to say is, might offend some people, but this is important. why do you think women in combat is not a good idea? >> i think we need to stress, this is quite an abstract notion. the number of women who will speak and equally is likely to be quite low, but of those who do, i think there are three concerns. the first, the first is is that we are going to see as we have already seen, the expansion roles of women steady downward pressure. strength and endurance requirements in order to ge
. >> you took photos of george w6789 bush that you see as book ends, an intense bush family during the disputed election with al gore, and then at the end, president bush leaving the white house? >> yeah, the first one was backstage election night in austin, texas. al gore had already conceded the election, but five minutes after that photo was taken, he called back and took it back which led us to that whole hanging chads scenario. but the final picture. the one that was taken four years ago today is george w. bush, last day as president walking out of the white house to the right is president-elect obama and what struck me about that moment was that bush never looked back, it's like, he threw the keys to the place over to obama and that was it. to me, it's a powerful moment. and also, again, goes to the transition of power of the united states. we have one party going to the next. it's peaceful, you and i have both been in places where the transitions are more difficult. >> that's for sure. thank you for taking the time to talk about these images. thank you so much. in the last f
clinton will be here today but there will be no former bush presidents. of course george h.w. bush is recovering from being ill. he's been in the hospital for quite some time. george w. bush decided to stay back in texas, too, although he did send his regrets. the leadership in congress, the joint chiefs. there is one member of the cabinet who will not be here. we don't know who it is yet but it's a so-called designated survivor, the person that stays behind just in case the unimaginable happens. it was then defense secretary robert gates four years ago. we're waiting to see who it is this time around. this is where all the big people will be sitting. they'll file in sometime a little over 9:00 a.m. zoraida? >> i love the view, john. i think you may have the best seat in the house right now. >> not bad. >> thank you very much. so the washington who's who will no doubt be in full party mode tonight with inaugural events planned around the city, the commander in chief's ball and the inaugural ball will bring out big names like katy perry, brad paisley, stevie wonder and alicia keys.
. barack obama was not responsible for the benghazi attack any more than george w. bush was responsible for the 9/11 attacks or ronald reagan was responsible for the attacks on our marine barracks in beirut which killed over 200 marines. and frankly whether it was called a terrorist attack or not, in the immediate aftermath as far as i'm concerned is irrelevant. we just have to make sure that it never happens again, so that in the future our people are protected. that's what i want to get out of all of this. so, madam secretary, we commend you for accepting all of the arb recommendations and welcome your commitment to begin implementing them by the time you leave the department. even before the arb submitted its conclusions, the department moved to address certain shortcomings through its increased security proposal, vast majority of the funding for this proposal would come from funds previously appropriated for lower priority programs. and i hope congress will move without delay to give the department the transfer authority it needs to start applying these changes. it is important to r
to specifically as her accomplishments in that role? >> well, she promoted smart power, meaning after george w. bush and the iraq war sending troops abroad. finding other ways to achieve goals in the war on terror. she's largely been the voice of the women's movement around the world. talking about democracy and women's issues. she's beloved by feminists and holds a feminist role of global stature and i think most significantly in the end she is just very well liked by presidents and prime ministers and our own u.s. military. i mean, talk to the generals and talk to the admirals. they all have great respect for her. she has promoted the internet and facebook, twitter as tools in diplomacy and foreign policy making, probably more than any other person working in our government. >> sounds like a very modern secretary of state but does come at a price in benghazi and that hearing she had where she said, does it really matter what happened on the ground? this will come back to haunt her no matter what she does. >> if she runs for president, though some of the sound bites from the hearings will obv
in 2005 by then president george w. bush. we're joined by sally, margaret, and van. we were talking before about climate change. what can the president do, what do you see him doing given him wanting to make efforts on gun control, on t
by then president george w. bush. we're joined by our panel. we were talking about before climate change. how much can the president really do? what do you see him doing given him wanting to make efforts on gun control on the budget? on the deficit? >> let me say two things that he can do. i got interrupted for miss alicia keys. i'm sorry. >> today is an incredible day. and you can feel the energy everywhere that you go. in so many ways, every day is a new day. and a new chance. a new chance to be our best. to serve our highest purpose. yeah. so i'm going to need your help tonight because i'm up here all by myself. i just wanted it to be me and you. so help me celebrate this most momentous day. i'll tell you what to do. i need you to say -- ♪ ♪ people say eh ♪ ♪ it's a new day ♪ it's a new day ♪ getting ready, everybody ready ♪ ♪ eh oh, a new day ♪ a new day ♪ celebrate and say eh, eh ♪ celebrate and say eh ♪ yeah because he's president and he's on fire. hotter than a fab as they like a highway ♪ ♪ he's living in a world and it's on fire filled with catastrophe ♪ ♪
on to that office. and one of the things that helped to elect george h.w. bush at the end of reagan was reagan went out on a high. he had some trouble in the second term but he went out on a high. and that really helped bush. i think that's important for biden that president obama succeed. >> i just missed this one but the last vice president before george h.w. bush was martin van buren. >> biden has constantly been in and out of the dog house for say things he wasn't supposed to say for the longest time. right now, he is in, as gloria was saying, just the perfect sweet spot for him, because he has succeeded. the challenge is, i'm trying to emphasize about this speech, we don't know what the president wants to done in his second ter. such a litany of agent that items. you know, less is more. there was too much "more" in this speech and that i think is the trap for him now, for biden. >> i think it was a bold list the president puts out. the question is was the priority, what does he go to first? in the sweetest spot for the parade, wolf blitzer. >> we're waiting for the president and the first lady
with us. >> thank you. >> former president george w. bush and his father, former president george h.w. bush, aren't attending this inaugural. president -- former president bill clinton and jimmy carter are. we are waiting to see president clinton. stand by for that. also taking a closer look at the downside of winning another four years of the white house. it doesn't always go so well. the second-term curse, as some call it. that's coming up as well. first, though, inaugural flashback. >> let me assert my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself. >> we all remember the phrase the only thing we have to fear is fear itself. but even more important than the phrase was the whole attitude that fdr had. he projected optimism and projected forward movement. people felt that's the mystery of leadership, that somehow the depression they were suffering, they weren't going to be alone anymore. they had a leader who was going to take care of it. when you have diabetes... your doctor will say get smart about your weight. that's why there's glucerna hunger smart shakes. they h
director. before that, the president could appoint anyone he wanted. so when president george w. bush nominated michael sullivan, it looked like an easy path, but he couldn't get a vote in a republican-controlled senate. >> did i ever think for a moment my nomination would be held up by a senator from idaho as related to one firearm licensed dealer? no. i didn't. >> idaho senator larry craig along with two other republican, all staunch supporters of the nra, held up sullivan's nomination, but it wasn't the nra's hands at work. it was about one local idaho gun seller's dispute with the atf. even silver himself said the nra didn't derail him. >> i didn't get any sense at all that the industry was opposed to my nomination. nor even the nra. >> when president obama took office, the senate just sat on his first nominee, andrew traver, even conservatives like house republican darrell issa called for action. >> andrew traver, who i believe is the 2010, november 2010 dezinate, should in fact be given an up or down vote. should in fact be given an opportunity to be confirmed. >> but republican
going through what happened with president george w. bush with the iraq war and president clinton with his personal indiscretion with 3407b monica lieu win aewinskylewinsk. why have presidents struggled so much in a second term? >> i think we have to look at the percentages, erin. to get to the second term you probably did pretty well in your first term, right? over the course of eight years it's not that unusual for a president to stupble or have a problem. so i think we've got to look at presidents over the whole eight years and get away from this second term curse. >> familiarity does breed contempt. we're not on too much. george washington had a lousy second term relatively speaking. he was the father of his country. no parties, unanimous choice of the american people. we don't like to talk about it, but people were taking a lot of potshots at him in the second term because that's when the jeffersonian republican party emerged. it was a tough time. he wanted to quit after his first term. they wouldn't let him, and he was sorry he hadn't. >> and they just throw things at him. t
washington, thomas jefferson, abraham lincoln and teddy roosevelt and george w. bush. >> that's what i'm saying. >> i think george w. bush. maybe fdr. >> stature, yeah. >> two roosevelts is confusing. >> maybe. i have to think about it and announce it tomorrow. we will be at the nationals games and spring training coming up very, very soon. thanks very much for that. >> sure. >> a prominent republican not mincing words saying his party needs to stop being stupid. they are meeting in north carolina. what they can do to rebound and remake their brand. would you take it? well, there is. [ male announcer ] it's called ocuvite. a vitamin totally dedicated to your eyes, from the eye care experts at bausch + lomb. as you age, eyes can lose vital nutrients. ocuvite helps replenish key eye nutrients. ocuvite has a unique formula not found in your multivitamin to help protect your eye health. now that's a pill worth taking. [ male announcer ] ocuvite. help protect your eye health. [ male announcer ] when we built the cadillac ats from the ground up to be the world's best sport sedan... ♪ ...pe
george w. bush was not elected president, but was close. not that many votes. he was close at that time. he has been a senator all of these years and now going to be the secretary of state. i don't think there is any doubt they will confirm him and he will go smoothly. >> you said relatively smoothly. you think the confirmation is expected? >> yes, the confirmation is expected. it will be overwhelming and a handful who vote against him if that, but he will be different next week when chuck hagel is the nominee for the defense secretary. that will be a lot more brutal as far as the q&a given his controversial positions. i suspect that hagel will be confirmed as well. >> let's talk about the two key personnel moves we are awaiting the announcement of at the white house about to come from the white house. tell us about that. >> mary jo white in new york spent years as the u.s. attorney and she is very, very tough. the president is going to nominate her to head the sec securities and exchange commission. that's going to be a major, major responsibility. this lady is very forceful in going a
h.w. bush did with speaker jim wright back in 1989. it's just an honoring day, unifying day. you can make the case but do it in a magnanimous way. >> i was going to say, congressman, sometimes i wonder if words matter at all at this point given the climate in washington, d.c. i only say this because i'm trying to at the same time look at the criticism of the exact same speech, the conservative group americans for prosperity called this a harshly ideological aggressively partisan speech more appropriate for the campaign trail. his address reads like a liberal laundry list while at the same time scott peaters, a democrat, said this is a call to action and we have the ability to work together. bernie sanders saying it's inspiring in its basic theme that we work together. i don't get it. you people who all do the same job, i understand partisanship, i just don't understand hyper partisanship. >> yeah, there's no place for hyperpartisanship. there are honest positions. the country is divided. even though the president won a big victory, he still got only 51, 52% of the vote. there is stil
, when president george w. bush was in office. that didn't last long. go back to president ronald reag reagan, republicans talking about the reagan revolution. from eight years of reagan, four years of bush, eight years of clinton, eight years of bush, that reagan's vision, if you will, sort of dominated the conversation. here's what speaker boehner has to understand. look on the state level, republican governors and state legislatures. you have republicans who control more state branches than they actually do democrats, and so this is just typical political whining as will said, both sides want to be in control. it's no doubt because you want to govern a lot easier, if your party controls all levels of political office. >> carol can we talk about what inspired boehner's statement? and that is that president obama's speech was openly progressive, not just on its face on its policy goals like you pointed out in climate change or gun control but in its philosophy as well. >> and? >> the elevation of collectiveism, of collective right, collective action. this is the cycle of american poli
in 2012. that was down from john mccain got 31% in 2000 and he lost. george w. bush proved the point. the republicans need to get about 40% or more to win a race for president. this isn't just about the presidency. look at a couple of senate races from 2012 right here. in the state of florida, democrats nearly 6 in 10 latino votes. in virginia, 62%. in arizona, 74%. we can go state, by state, by state. democrats sometimes above 60% in the latino vote. you look at the demographics. republicans can't sustain themselves. let's look at the house races. in 2012, 68%. again, nearly 7 in 10 latinos vote democratic. that's matching the numbers from 2008. 70% 7 70%. in 2004, it was 66%. yes, there are policy questions. senator mccain was honest enough to say, a lot of this being dictated by election results. >> the senate looks like they're working on a bipartisan way for comprehensive immigration reform. it's moving along in the senate. what about the house of representatives? >> i wouldn't get too far out ahead of yourself and say this will pass the house but there is clear changes under wa
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)